BA (Hons) History & Heritage

What is the Course About?

Faculty: Creative and Leisure Industries

Department: Art & Design

Course Tutor: Dr Catriona Mackie

If you want to learn more about life in the past, and how the past influences us today, then the History & Heritage degree is for you. It’s a wide-ranging degree which covers aspects of local and international history and heritage from ancient times to the present.

What subjects will I study?

If you want to learn more about life in the past, and how the past influences us today, then the History & Heritage degree is for you. It’s a wide-ranging degree which covers aspects of local and international history and heritage from ancient times to the present.

The primary focus of the degree is history. You’ll study a range of core modules that will introduce you to some of history’s most significant events, and will enable you to explore and develop your skills as an independent researcher. You’ll learn about the process and methods of historical research and the ways in which the past has been interpreted and re-interpreted over time.

Heritage gives us a different perspective on the study of the past and on the way in which the past impacts upon us today. Through three core heritage modules, you’ll examine the role of the heritage industry in representing the past, and the ways in which heritage is managed, understood, and use by governments, heritage agencies and communities. You will have the opportunity to explore some of the big questions and issues in heritage studies today, including the rise of heritage tourism, the popularity of ‘dark’ heritage sites such as Auschwitz, and the trade in portable antiquities. The third-year heritage module is taught in collaboration with staff at Manx National Heritage, to give you a real-world perspective on the heritage industry.

Optional modules cover a wide range of topics, including the American Revolution, Medieval women, nineteenth-century crime and punishment, the Vietnam War, the French Revolution, and Scandinavian history.

A five-week work placement in your second year, in an organisation of your choosing, will help to develop valuable employability skills and help you plan for your future.

Days and hours of attendance

Around 10-12 hours per week. Timetables vary from year to year.

Specialist uniform and/or kit required

None

What Happens Next

1. Once you apply online, we will send you an email so you know we have received your application.

2. If you are new to UCM, you will be asked to attend an Information Sharing Appointment (ISA) when you find out more about UCM and the course you've applied for, and we find out more about you.

After your ISA, we will either:

* make you an unconditional offer (i.e. a definite place on the course);

* make you a conditional offer (i.e. a place on the course IF you get the results required in the summer exams);

* place you on a waiting list, if the course is already full (if this is the case, we will also advise you to apply for another course, just in case);

* suggest you apply for another course because the one you have applied for is not suitable for you.

Once you have a place, you will be asked in to enrol in person.

Information Sharing Appointment (ISA)

Which campus

TBC

Timetable and what to expect

TBC

What to wear

TBC

What to bring

TBC

Useful links

Course Fee PolicyStudent Awards (Grants)Free School MealsBusesInternational ApplicationsChildcare SupportStudent Emergency Fund

What are my progression and career options?

The skills gained by history and heritage graduates are highly valued in the workplace, and a degree in History & Heritage will open up a world of employment possibilities.

Graduates routinely find employment in business, management, law, the media, marketing, government, public relations, civil service, education, the heritage industry and tourism.

If you’re not quite sure yet what sector you want to go into, a degree in History & Heritage will provide you with the skills you need to find work in a range of different areas.

How will I be assessed?

Most modules have more than one type of assessment. For some modules you may have to write an essay or a book review, or prepare an analysis of an historical document. Other forms of assessment include oral presentations, posters, and project work.

The variety of assessments enables you to develop a wide range of different skills throughout your degree.

Entry requirements

96 UCAS points or equivalent. Mature applicants (over 21) will be considered on the basis of their previous academic achievements, work experience, life skills, or professional qualifications.